Know More About BCAA!

Branch Chain Amino Acids make up 35% of your muscle mass. They must be present for molecular growth and development. BCAA builds cells and repairs tissue and also form antibodies as they are part of the enzyme and hormonal system.

What’s The Function of BCAA
BCAA’S act as nitrogen carriers which assist the muscles in synthesizing other amino acids needed for anabolic muscle action. In simpler terms, BCAA’s combine simpler amino acids to form a complex whole muscle tissue. In this action, BCAA’s stimulate production of insulin, the main function of which is to allow circulating blood sugar to be taken up by the muscle cells and used as a source of energy. This insulin production promotes amino acid uptake by the muscle.

How Does BCAA Work?
During intense weight training the body is normally in a highly catabolic condition. At this time glycogen stores are being rapidly depleted and the liver in turn must synthesize glucose by a conversion of L-Alanine. Alanine makes up over half of the amino acid content released from muscles during exercise. The release of BCAA’s is generally recognized as the signal to the body to stop protein syntheses in the muscles, especially during times of stress. Providing the Branch Chain Amino Acids, especially during those times of stress may profoundly affect this signal and allow protein synthesis to continue onward.

When is The Best Time For BCAA
Taking them after with a post work out meal or recovery drink will help speed the replacement of BCAA’s in the muscles, speeding muscle recovery and preventing overtraining. For optimum results in supplement form, it is desirable to take your BCAA’s separately from the other amino acid groupings for the fact that they totally dominate the race for entry into the bodies’ systems.